New Distracted Driving Law

Governor Inslee recently signed into law the Driving Under the Influence of Electronics (DUIE) Act. This act targets drivers distracted by the use of electronic handheld devices used while driving. This act was originally slated to take effect January 1, 2019, however Governor Inslee vetoed the portion of the bill that delayed its enactment, and the bill now becomes enforceable in late July of 2017.

Here is what you need to know about the new DUIE laws.

  • They are a primary offense, meaning the officer needs no additional violations to stop and cite you.
    • The second offense will double the fine.
  • This is a moving violation, meaning it is reported to your insurance company on your driving record and will influence your insurance rates.
  • DUIE includes any use of a personal electronic device that is not specifically exempted.
    • Exemptions include calling 911, transit system employees (for certain purposes), CDL drivers (for certain purposes permitted under the federal code), and emergency vehicles.
    • The statue also appears to allow the use of one finger to activate the device if the device is docked hands free. For example, to initiate GPS, music, Bluetooth activation, or other hands-free enabled mode.
      • The one finger exemption does not allow for sending or reading texts, viewing video, or any other reason that would take your eyes off the road (the use of GPS will likely be an area of the statute the causes some difficulty in its application).
  • As of late July you can no longer use your phone on speaker phone while holding the phone. The simple act of holding the phone is defined as “use” and is prohibited (even if the phone is off apparently).
  • There is also a secondary offense of driving dangerously distracted.
    • A secondary offense means you cannot be pulled over only for that reason, but it can be added to a primary offense.
    • This infraction will add a base fine of $30 to the ticket (likely to be more once costs are added to the base fine).
    • This too appears to be reportable to your insurance company.
  • The definition of driving dangerously distracted is quite vague and can be applied to many different actions.
    • “‘dangerously distracted’ means a person who engages in any activity not related to the actual operation of a motor vehicle in a manner that interferes with the safe operation of such motor vehicle.”
    • This definition could be applied to any act that is not directly related to driving (such as eating, changing the radio station, attending to a child, putting on make-up etc.)

Once the law is enacted and enforced we will learn more about its implementation and enforcement. With Governor Inslee drastically speeding up the time frame, I would expect the State to be heavily enforcing this when it rolls out in July. Be aware and be prepared now. There are significant statistics that link distracted driving to collisions and I would expect insurance companies to adjust rates once these tickets start getting reported. If you get cited with a traffic violation, DUIE or other, call the Law Firm of Lucas D. McWethy at 206-427-4901 to discuss your options to keep that ticket off your record and away from your insurance.

See the actual text of the Statute here.

Advertisements