How do I choose a Skagit County Laywer?

Being accused and charged of crime in Skagit County can be an intimidating situation. whether you are charged with a Mt. Vernon DUI, a Burlington Theft, or Skagit County felony, you need a Skagit County Lawyer to represent you from the beginning. But how do you choose a Lawyer? Where do you begin? What questions should you ask? A personal recommendation from someone you know is usually the best starting point, but do your own research as well. The Lawyer you choose is going to have an enormous impact on your case and its eventual impact on your future. Below are a few starting points to determine help you choose a lawyer to best represent you.

What kind of lawyer do you need?  The first step is to determine what kind of lawyer you need. If you have been charged with a crime in Skagit County, you need a Skagit County criminal defense lawyer. If it is an eviction, you need a landlord/tenant lawyer. If you want to sue someone for an injury or a harm done, you want either a personal injury lawyer or a civil attorney. There are numerous online resources to help you narrow your search down to the specific category of lawyer you need.

Compile a list of at least 3 lawyers: Utilizing Google, Avvo.com, personal recommendations, or other sources, compile a list of at least 3 lawyers that have the skill you  need. Then, contact them and set of a consultation. Most criminal defense attorneys like myself offer a free initial consultation. This does not mean that you need to set up 3 separate consultations, but at least call the offices and get a feel for how they do business. Is the lawyer willing to speak with you on the phone? How difficult is it get an appointment with the lawyer? Will they discuss fees over the phone or only in person? Trust and compatibility are both necessary for a productive attorney/client relationship. You should be able to get an initial feel for this by placing a phone call to the Law Firm.

Meet with you best candidates: After placing the phone calls, set up a consultation (I recommend in person, however an in depth consult over the phone or skype may accomplish this goal as well). Speak with them about your case, your history, your goals and get their feedback. Are they giving you honest and realistic feedback? Or are they just telling you what you want to hear? It is rare that a criminal charge will be defended without any difficult decisions to make (plea to a lesser charge vs. trial etc). You need a lawyer that is going to be honest and up front, and that starts with the consultation. You want a skilled lawyer, not just a skilled salesman.

Fully discuss fees: This is particularly important if you are paying hourly or based on a percentage if the case is won. Discuss the fees and get it all in writing. Since I am a criminal defense lawyer, I will touch on how we establish fees. The Washington State Bar Association does not allow criminal defense lawyers to base their fees on a contingent fee (meaning we are only paid if we win). So we must either charge hourly or a flat fee. A flat fee is established up front by the attorney making an assessment of the case and the time that will be involved. Some lawyers will also break up their services into flat fee categories. Meaning, this is the price for representation up to a certain established point, then this amount if you want to continue to fight, then this amount for trial. An example of this is that I charge a flat fee for all representation up to the determination to go to trial. The vast majority of cases in Washington State settle by plea agreement prior to trial. I do not believe in charging someone for a service they may not utilize, so I charge a flat affordable fee for representation, then an hourly fee for trial should the determination be made that trial is the way to go. No matter what, get the fee structure in writing and make sure you understand it.

Find an attorney that fits you financial means: If you cannot afford a lawyer, one will be provided to you by the court. However, you do not get to choose your public defender, they are assigned. There are some great public defenders out there, but they are very typically overworked and underpaid. If you are able to retain a private lawyer, you get to choose someone you trust and they are typically mush more accessible. You do not need to be rich or have an immense savings to afford a lawyer. There is a wide range of lawyers that all charge different amounts, with different size retainers, and some, like myself, offer affordable payment plans as well. The cost of an attorney is not always reflective of their skill. Established attorneys that have been in practice for decades can often charge much more. However, laws change rapidly, case-law changes decisions, and Judges and prosecutors are replaced. What worked in criminal defense in 1985 may not be relevant anymore. Speak with the Lawyer to determine their skill, knowledge and expertise. Do not just rely on how long they have been a lawyer.

I hope this helps you on the first step to determining the best Skagit County Lawyer for you. If you have any questions, please feel fee to leave them in the comment section. If you or a loved one has been accused of a crime in Skagit County, call the Law Firm of Lucas D. McWethy for a free consultation.

School resource officer had sex with Bothell teen

It is often easy for us to forget that behind a person’s chosen profession, is still a person. And people are flawed. Different professions give us different amounts of power, and responsibility. To quote Spider-man, with great power comes great responsibly. Just about any profession can offer temptation to bend or break the rules. Everything from taking pens from work to embezzling millions to endangering someones life. The more power you have over another, the more oversight must be provided and ultimately the harsher the punishment for the wrongdoing. As a Lynnwood Criminal Defense Attorney, there is legal oversight as well as the Bar Association the monitors attorneys conduct.

This is often my rationale for why police officers must be held to a higher standard then others. A police officer is imbued with the power of the State to act on behalf of the State. This includes the ability to deprive an individual of the property, privacy, liberty, and in the most extreme cases their life. I have a profound amount of respect for most Officers. They do a dangerous job that most of would not. But, the recent trend of poor police work, and in some cases outright criminal conduct, has put good put honest police officer in more danger and under more scrutiny.

Take the recent case of the school resource officer who had had sex with a Bothell Teenager. The Teenager was only 17 when she first had sexual contact with Officer Dione Thompson, then in her 40’s. According to the charging documents, the sexual contact first occurred in the Officer’s vehicle outside of the school library. Because of the age of the teenager and the position of the Officer, consent is not possible. If true, the Officer clearly abused her power and took sexual advantage of the teenager. Taking sexual advantage of a 17 year old is unacceptable, especially when the perpetrator is the Officer tasked with protecting them.

Behind the shield is person, and you do not always know what that person is capable of. Protect yourself by knowing your rights. Treat Officers with respect, many of them are there to protect you, do their job, and go home to their families. But for the ones that blur the line between lawful and unlawful conduct, protect yourself by knowing your rights. If you are the target of a criminal investigation or have already been accused of a crime, contact a Snohomish criminal defense attorney to stand by you. Just because you have been accused of a crime and the evidence paints a bleak picture, does not mean that you have to roll over. Contact the Law Firm of Lucas D. McWethy to receive a free consultation regarding you DUI, Assault 4, Theft or other criminal charge and find out how we can fight to preserve your future. 206-427-4901

DV Assault and the No Contact Order

Getting arrested for Assault in the fourth degree is a scary circumstance. There is the fact that you have just been arrested, the question of whether or not the police will hold you in jail, and whether or not this allegation will have a domestic violence (DV) qualifier added to it. If the alleged Assault occurred against a family member, someone you live with, or someone you have had an intimate relationship with, the answer is yes, it will have a DV tag on it. The DV tag can be added to a number of charges including Assault, Malicious Mischief, Reckless Endangerment, Stalking, and much more listed in RCW 10.99.020 (5).

So what does it mean to you if the prosecutor files the Assault in the 4th degree with a Domestic Violence tag on it? Well, if you were arrested in Lynnwood, Washington for Assault 4 DV, this would mean that you were likely held in jail over night or until you could appear in front of the Lynnwood Municipal Court Judge. The Judge would then review the allegations and decide what conditions of release should be imposed, or if you should be held on bail. With the Domestic Violence tag, a no contact order will almost always be entered in against you. This means that upon your release, you may not be able to go home or have any contact with the alleged victim, even if the victim does not want this order. The order is entered in by the Judge, typically at the request of the prosecutor. Have an attorney there to assist you as early as possible is the best chance you have at avoiding no contact order.

The original intent of these no contact orders were to protect people that could not or would not protect themselves. People in a cycle of domestic violence that are so intertwined in the circumstances that they are not able to act in their own best interest. The no contact order allows the State to step in and protect that person while determining if the pending criminal charge is viable. Unfortunately, the use of the no contact order in the criminal realm has exceeding this original intent. It is now common for the court to enter these no contact orders on every Domestic Violence charge unless presented with convincing reason not to. The courts want to err on the side of caution (and avoid any liability). And while the courts are being cautions, families that want to reconcile and work through their difficulties are separated and endure significant financial difficulty (the expense of an attorney and sometimes a second residence for a significant period of time). These no contact orders typically last until the criminal allegations are settled. Violating a no contact order is an additional criminal violation that may carry jail time and revoke probation on the original charge.

What I am describing is a no contact order issued by the judge in a criminal proceeding. There are also no contact orders that can be issued by either the District Court or the Superior Court through a civil proceeding. These cases are typically originated by the victim and are completely different than what I describe above. But I will save the particulars of that for another blog.

If a no contact order has been entered in against you or a family member, sometimes the best way to get the no contact order lifted is to aggressively fight the underlying allegations. Getting a resolution and settling the underlying Assault IV DV will typically end the courts jurisdiction on imposing the no contact order (although there are ways for the court to impose a new one). It is important to your future to fight this allegation and at the very least get the DV tag dropped from the charge. Any criminal conviction with a DV tag can have serious consequences on you future.

If you or a family member of been accused of a Domestic Violence allegation, contact the Law Firm of Lucas D. McWethy to schedule your free case evaluation and consultation. Just because you have been accused of a crime does not mean you have to surrender your future. Call 206-427-4901 to discuss your case.